How Heights Celebrates Hannukah

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Emma Hubbard

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May 9, 2019
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How Heights Celebrates Hannukah

Jewish families light up their homes with the light from their Menorahs.

Jewish families light up their homes with the light from their Menorahs.

Mya Hubbard

Jewish families light up their homes with the light from their Menorahs.

Mya Hubbard

Mya Hubbard

Jewish families light up their homes with the light from their Menorahs.

Mark Sack
Heights Jewish Student Union Club enjoys their Hannukah celebration

For most students at Cleveland Heights High School, Hannukah is unfamiliar and can be thought of as just a Jewish version of Christmas. While some parts of that are true, it is also an important holiday in Jewish culture and has an interesting place and story of its own. Hannukah takes place at a different time each year, according to the Jewish calendar. This year, it was the week of December 2nd through the 10th.
Hannukah is celebrated to commemorate the miracle of a drop of oil lasting for eight nights instead of one, after the destruction of the temple by the Romans. Because of this, Jewish people light candles for eight nights and eat foods fried in oil.
Noah Frazier, a Jewish student, and a junior at Heights celebrates Hannukah every year with his family. Traditions vary from home to home, but his favorite is eating food and being together with his family. He doesn’t go to temple to celebrate but recognizes the holiday in his own way. His family lights the menorah and has a fun time altogether. As he’s gotten older, he has noticed the differences and similarities between Christmas and Hannukah. Both are thought of as a time for gift giving, but the story of Christmas is birth while Hannukah is about a miracle in the midst of war. Noah’s favorite part about being Jewish in general are the stories and traditions that come with each holiday he celebrates.
Junior Abra Lisowski is not Jewish herself but has many friends who are and who celebrate the holiday. She has never participated in a Hannukah celebration but knows that families light menorahs and eat fried foods. She also thinks of it as a type of Jewish Christmas. While Abra hasn’t participated in Hannukah, she has celebrated other Jewish holidays, such as Passover. Passover occurs in springtime, usually in late March or early April. The story behind Passover is the Jewish people’s escape from slavery in Egypt. The holidays are celebrated differently, but have a couple of things in common, most important and obvious is the food.
Christmas and Hannukah are similar in the ways of family connection and gift-giving, but are different in the stories and formality. Most Jewish people don’t attend services during Hannukah, but rather celebrate with their own traditions and in their own homes. It is about the miracle of light but is celebrated in modern times as a connection of families.

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About the Writer
Emma Hubbard, Editor-in-Chief

Emma Hubbard is a junior at Heights and this is her first year on the newspaper. She is excited to write about current and cultural events that can have...

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How Heights Celebrates Hannukah